Assessment and Research Dialogues – Spring 2019

Research and Assessment Dialogues

Spring 2019

Student Affairs staff members, mark your calendars for these research and assessment presentations. All are welcome.

February 19        ”Attitudes, Behaviors and Expectations for College of CSU First-year Students: Selected Results from the 2018 Annual Freshman Survey”

                                Presenter: Dr. Dave McKelfresh

                                376-78 Lory Student Center, 12 noon – 1:00 p.m.

February 28        “Results of the 2018 (MSL) Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership”

                                Presenters: Hermen Diaz and Michael Marr

                                328-30 Lory Student Center, 12 noon – 1:00 p.m.

March 7                “Perceptions About Math Placement and Pre-Calculus/Calculus Math Courses Among College First-Generation, Low-Income, Students of Color”

                                Presenter: Dr. Gaye DiGregorio

                                322 Lory Student Center, 12 noon – 1:00 p.m.

Please see below for a more detailed description of these sessions.

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Attitudes and Characteristics of CSU First-year Students – Selected Results from the 2018 Annual Freshman Survey

                Tuesday, February 19

                12 noon – 1:00 p.m.

                376-78 Lory Student Center

                Presenter: Dr. Dave McKelfresh

In this research of the 52nd annual administration of the CIRP Freshman Survey a number of interesting results will be discussed. Results will focus on: Why students go to college, why students choose to attend CSU, and student attitudes, behaviors and expectations for college. The results are based on data from fall 2018 first-time, full-time, first-year students at hundreds of four year colleges and universities.

Please RSVP to david.mckelfresh@colostate.edu.

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Results of the 2018 (MSL) Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership

                Thursday, February 28

                12 noon – 1:00 p.m.

                328-30 Lory Student Center

                Presenters: Hermen Diaz and Michael Marr

The Multi-Institutional Study of Leadership (MSL) is a survey instrument examining the influence of higher education on students’ leadership development. Rooted in the Social Change Model of Leadership (SCM) and Astin’s (1993) Inputs-Environments-Outcomes (I-E-O) college impact model, the MSL measures student characteristics, demographics, and engagement with on-campus and off-campus activities in an effort to examine influences of higher education on college student leadership development. This session will offer an overview of how CSU students responded to the 2018 MSL, a comparison to national results, and provide an opportunity to make meaning of these results.

Please RSVP to david.mckelfresh@colostate.edu.

______________________________________________________________________________

Perceptions About Math Placement and Pre-Calculus/Calculus Math Courses Among College First-Generation, Low-Income, Students of Color

                Thursday, March 7

                12 noon – 1:00 p.m.

                322 Lory Student Center

                Presenter: Dr. Gaye DiGregorio

The purpose of this study was to explore first-generation, low-income, students’ of color experiences with first- year pre-calculus/calculus courses, focusing on their self-belief in being successful in math. The students’ strong dedication to learning and valuing the benefit of higher education was combined with an extreme pressure to succeed. The math placement process revealed anxiety with this high stakes exam, and was viewed with a fixed mindset. Consequently, the placement exam did not enhance their self-belief in being successful in college math. Student experiences in math courses that positively influenced self-belief focused on the transformation as engaged learners; including valuing practicing, devoting time, gaining mastery with mathematical concepts, working with other students, and asking for help.  Course components that impacted their self-belief to be successful in math were inclusive pedagogies including group active learning, diverse experiences and approaches, and a community of care in the classroom. Highlighted support structures were course feedback, learning assistants, and the math lab.  A community approach to learning math integrates engaged learning with inclusive pedagogies and support structures, which may enhance self-belief and success in math.  Please RSVP to david.mckelfresh@colostate.edu.


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